Importance of Being In Shape for the Apocalypse

It is pretty easy to get caught up in the act of packing bug out bags, stockpiling food and water and gathering basic supplies that will help you live after SHTF. Prepping is all about making sure you can survive with what you have. In a worst case scenario, you would have to bug out to safety. It isn’t like bugging out means you walk across the street. You are going to have to put some distance between you and whatever it is that has threatened your life.

In almost any scenario, bugging out is going to have to be done on foot. You aren’t going to have the luxury of jumping in the family car and driving away from disaster. You and about a million other people are all going to have the same idea in mind. Have you ever tried to drive home after attending a big concert or sporting event? It is chaos. You get nowhere fast. When you have the end of the world breathing down your neck, you can’t afford to sit in a traffic jam. You have to walk.

Could you physically walk 20 to 30 miles in the shape you are in now? Could you do it carrying your bug out bag or possibly even carrying your small child? If the answer is maybe, you are in trouble. You can’t just assume you will somehow find the energy and ability to do something so physically exhausting because you have to. You may be able to make it to your destination, but you are going to be drained.

You need to get in shape now. Quit spending your weekends on the couch watching survival shows. Get up and move. Walk around the block several times, go hiking, run on the high school track. You need to get your body into shape so you can walk and actually breathe when you are trying to survive. Don’t be the person who holds the rest of the group because you have to stop and catch your breath. GET IN SHAPE!

Preparing for Heavy Rains and Flooding

Spring rains and melting mountain snow can spell catastrophe for those who live near rivers, streams or other bodies of water. It is hard to fully grasp the power of water until you see it up close and personal. Water is a force to be reckoned with and can tear away roads and the ground they sit on top of with very little effort. Washouts, sinkholes and flooding in general can be devastating. Even when you think you are prepared, you may not truly be ready for the aftermath of water running over riverbeds and creating it’s own path.

If you are traveling anywhere this spring, always be prepared. You could find yourself stuck for hours if a road has been washed out.

The following items should be a part of your spring emergency vehicle kit.

  • Ponchos—several
  • Extra pairs of socks
  • Rainboots or waterproof boots
  • Change of clothes (being wet will chill you and be miserable in general)
  • Food
  • Water
  • Wet wipes (you are going to get dirty if you are stuck in a hole or in the mud)
  • Folding shovel
  • Hand warmers
  • Toilet paper
  • Portable cell phone charger
  • Tow chain
  • Water repellent jacket

Make sure you have a full tank of gas, just in case you need to sit in your car with the engine running to stay warm.

If you find yourself stuck in the mud or the victim of a surprise washout or sinkhole, you may have to try and get yourself out. In many cases, it is a quick fix, but you will get wet and muddy. Be prepared and if you happen to find yourself on a road that has been closed temporarily or stranded alone on a deserted road, you will be able to deal with the consequences much easier.

Prepping for Everything, Hoping for Nothing

A lot of preppers will pick a disaster and go all out prepping for that one potential disaster. Some people will ask you what you are preparing to live through and you may feel obligated to come up with one answer. Here’s the deal. No one has a crystal ball. No one can predict the future. There are so many possible scenarios that could leave the world as we know it in dire shape, it is impossible to really pick just one.

While many disaster prepping scenarios have a lot of overlap, there may be things you miss if you concentrate solely on one potential apocalypse-causing event. Instead of being hyper-focused on one particular event, broaden your horizons and think of the bigger picture.

Some of the disasters that are often thought about and prepared for are as follows;

  • Massive natural disaster i.e. earthquake, tornadoes, hurricane
  • Flooding
  • Nuclear war—war in general
  • EMP
  • Economic collapse
  • Civil unrest
  • Power grid failure
  • Pandemic

Each of these disasters requires a little extra planning and some targeted supplies. For example; a pandemic prep will likely include a lot more medical supplies and protective covering for survivors. When you think about any large scale disaster, you have to assume sanitation is going to be heavy hit. That means more people are going to be sick. Without hospitals and medicines, a pandemic is likely to happen.

It would be wise to have the supplies used to live through a pandemic on hand regardless what you are preparing for. The same can be said of preparing for civil unrest. It isn’t going to be long before the power grid fails and an economic collapse ensues. When a power grid fails, it won’t be long before nuclear reactors meltdown.

Disasters are all linked in so many ways. One disaster triggers another. It is going to be a chain reaction. Your best bet is to prepare for everything and hope nothing happens. Cover all of your bases. That is the best motto for a true prepper.

Where to Start on Your Prepping Journey

If you are new to prepping and trying to figure out where to get started, you will find the answers you are looking for here. The trick is to take bite size pieces. You don’t have to go all out in the first week. As you can imagine, stockpiling food, water and other necessities can get very expensive. This is why you need to take it slow and easy and be ready to spring on a really great deal.

You will want to start by taking an inventory of your home. What do you have right now that you could count towards your prepping. Head to the attic, garage or wherever and start digging through the stuff you have stored in boxes. You likely have quite a bit to get you started. Things like;

Blankets that aren’t regularly used
Camping gear
Clothing you don’t wear, including old boots, gloves, coats and what not
Extra tools
Old dishes

These are items that will come in handy after a major collapse. Earmark these items to be included in your stockpile.

Next, you will want to find somewhere to keep your stockpile. If you have a basement, garage or attic, you can start there. If not, you will need to find a closet or designate an area in a room to stash your supplies. Ideally, you will want to do what you can to keep it as neat and organized as possible. This will allow you to find what you have easily as well as allow you to know what you have.

Once you have an area planned out, it is time to start thinking about food and water. Most people only really have the room inside their home to store a few cases or jugs of water. You can invest in an outdoor cistern or food grade rain barrels that can be filled up and stored against the house or in another shady area. You will need to purify this water before using.

Food can be purchased as you go. Buy a little extra each time you go to the grocery store. Try budgeting out $30 a week or so to buy extra food. Buy bulk dried foods when possible. You will save money this way.

Try to save a little money in a kitty jar that can be put towards a big purchase item, like a large water filter, solar panel or other item that will be helpful, but can be expensive. This kitty can also be used to buy when you come across a great deal.

Always scour Craigslist, the nickel ads and shop yard sales to pad your supplies. You will be amazed at what you can find. Take it slow and easy and you will see how quickly your stockpile builds up without spending a lot of money in one big shopping spree.