Revisiting Winter Weather Preparedness

snowWith much of the country gearing up for a wild winter, it is a good time to talk about winter preparedness. A heavy snowfall or severe weather that results in icy roads or widespread power outages can put people’s lives at risk. If you are prepared for such nasty weather, you don’t have to worry about much more than how you will pass the time.

Winter weather preparedness means you need to be prepared to get stuck at home for days on end. You will have to eat what you have in the pantry and fridge. There is also a good chance you will have to be prepared to stay warm without the luxury of your electric furnace. You will likely need a supply of ready-to-eat foods that do not require cooking if you don’t have a woodstove to cook on.

There are many elements to winter preparedness. You want to get prepared now, even if you don’t think you will ever need your preps. The old saying, “to have it and not need it is better than to need it and not have it.”

This list will cover the things you need to think about and prepare for.

*A backup source of heat i.e. woodstove or fireplace, if this isn’t possible, you will need to be prepared to seal off a room in the house to try and keep warm with candles, blankets and body heat

*Have a supply of non-perishable foods, you have to assume the power will go out and food in the fridge and freezer will be difficult to cook and may spoil

*Have a supply of rock salt to make the areas you need to walk on outside a little safer

*Have plenty of board games, books and your favorite nonelectrical hobby to keep entertained

*If you do have a woodstove, load up on dry wood nowwood-1767521_1280

*If possible, invest in a portable generator

*Have an emergency kit that includes candles, matches, flashlights and spare batteries

*A snow shovel will be a must, if you can get your hands on a snowblower it will save you some manual labor, don’t forget a roof rake to pull the snow off the roof to prevent a roof collapse

*Plenty of winter gear i.e. wool socks, coats, hats, gloves and waterproof boots, have backups in case the first set gets wet or tears

Usually, in the event of severe winter weather, life gets back to normal within a few days. During that time, you must be prepared to do with what you have at home. You may not be able to go to work, schools will typically be canceled and the whole family will be home. Prepare to feed, entertain and keep everyone warm. Look at it as some time to bond with the family.

Your vehicle needs to be prepared as well. We will cover that in next week’s post.

Is La Nina a Legit Threat?

hurricane-67581_640If you live anywhere on the west side of the United States, you have probably heard a lot about La Nina. La Nina is a mean witch who is threatening to dump boat loads of snow on parts of the country. If you live on the east coast, you have also heard about La Nina. The southeast may get more violent hurricanes with this change in weather patterns. Basically, it is a real threat that everyone needs to prepare for. The entire world will experience some extreme weather, good and bad.

People who live in the northern parts of the country expect snow, but extreme snow is rare. Snow in the north is a part of life. However, no matter how much you expect it, when Mother Nature dumps more than 96 inches of snow in a matter of weeks, it is going to cause some problems. It has been almost 10 years since the last La Nina. For those that remember, it was an excellent year for the ski resorts in the northwest and parts of Utah and Colorado. This winter seems to be shaping up that way as well.snow WV

Are you ready?

If you live in an area that is likely to get a great deal of snow, you need to start preparing for the worst now. Don’t wait until it happens. That will leave you scrambling to get your hands on what you need because all of the other procrastinators took it all. Do what you can to start getting what you need now. The following list includes some of the things you will likely need.

This list is certainly not comprehensive, but it will get you off to a good start. If you have the ability to budget a new generator, snow blower or even a plow, go for it. You can never be too prepared. Don’t wait until you are buried under several feet of snow to figure out you need something like a good, sturdy snow shovel.